Baylor College of Medicine

2017 Compassion and the Art of Medicine series begins

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The annual Compassion and the Art of Medicine series hosted by the Department of Family and Community Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine will take place this fall.

The series is directed by Dr. Kenya Steele, associate professor of family and community medicine at Baylor, and is free and open to the public. All presentations begin at 12:10 p.m.

Funds for the series are provided by the Department of Family and Community Medicine and the Maye E. (Pat) and Alan Lambert, M.D. '52, Family and Community Medicine Endowment.

The 2017 series includes:

“Playback Theatre” – (Aug. 11, Cullen Auditorium)

The Houston Playback Theatre is a unique collaboration between performers and the audience. An audience member tells a story or moment from their life, chooses actors to play the different roles, and everyone watches as the story is immediately recreated and given artistic shape. Since 1975, Playback has spread all over the world and is now performed in many different countries and in a variety of social and professional settings.

“Matthew Carter Memorial Lecture” – Dr. Claire Bocchini (Aug. 25, Cullen Auditorium)

The Matthew Carter Memorial Lecture honors the memory of the first-year Baylor medical student killed in September 2000 and carries on his message of compassion and caring to successive generations of medical students and health professionals. The annual events include a lecture and day of community service by Baylor students.

Dr. Claire Bocchini is an assistant professor of pediatrics at Baylor and a pediatric infectious disease specialist at Texas Children’s Hospital. She completed her medical education, residency and fellowship at Baylor. Her research focuses on incorporating screenings for social determinants of health into routine pediatric care. Bocchini trains medical students and residents in community health and legislative advocacy. She is one of the founding members and current co-president of Doctors for Change, a Houston-based group of health professionals who work to increase access to care and improve the health of all Texans through research, collaboration, education and advocacy.

“A Primary Care Career: The View from the Rearview Mirror” – Dr. Jeffrey Steinbauer (Sept. 8, Cullen Auditorium)

Dr. Jeffrey Steinbauer found a medical career via a circuitous route. He had dreams of being a professional jazz musician but a tour of Southeast Asia near the end of the Vietnam War with the USO show gave him a glimpse of the challenges people face worldwide, including access to healthcare, and awakened a desire to serve a “greater good.” He gave up his musical aspirations and attended medical school, where he discovered an interest in family medicine. After completing his residency, he worked as a quintessential small-town doctor. The lessons learned in this small town informed his medical care for the remainder of his career and served as a compass for teaching residents and medical students. At Baylor, Steinbauer is professor of family and community medicine, medical director of the Corporate Care Program, director of the Quality Reporting Group and chief medical officer for the Texas Division of Baylor/CHI Physician Network.

“Living with Moebius Syndrome: A 30 Year Retrospect” – Steven Maldonado (Sept. 15, Kleberg Auditorium)

Steven Maldonado is a Houston native who currently works as an administrative coordinator at Baylor College of Medicine in the section of immunology, allergy and rheumatology. He attended the University of Houston Bauer School of Business, where he received his Bachelor’s degree in business administration. Currently, he is an M.B.A. candidate in the Texas A&M Professional M.B.A. program at Houston. He will discuss his firsthand experience with Moebius Syndrome, a rare facial paralysis condition, and the lessons learned in the last 30 years.

“At Least My Child Doesn’t Have That” – Sami and Laura Rahman (Oct. 6, Kleberg Auditorium)

Sami and Laura Rahman are the parents of two children, Noah and Maya. Noah, who has cerebral palsy and short gut syndrome, was born prematurely at 27 1/2 weeks and spent 164 days in the NICU. Sami is the co-founder of the Bridging Apps Program at Easter Seals of Greater Houston, a volunteer community for parents, therapists, doctors and teachers sharing information about using the iPad and mobile devices with people who have special needs. He is the CEO of a technology company and the author of “Getting Started: iPads 4 Special Needs.” Laura is “chief cat herder” as well as a partner at Powers & Frost, LLP. The Rahmans will share their experiences as the parents of a child with a chronic medical condition through the NICU, PICU and beyond.

“Sympathetic Vibrations: Exploring Sir William Osler’s Wondrous Literary References” – Megan Cole (Oct. 13, Cullen Auditorium)

Megan Cole has had a long acting career on the professional stage, including TV guest-star appearances on “Seinfeld,” “ER,” “The Practice,” various “Star Treks,” “Judging Amy,” “Las Vegas” and many others. She originated the leading role in Margaret Edson’s Pulitzer Prize-winning drama “WIT” in 1995, for which she received the L.A. Drama Critics’ Circle Award for Outstanding Performance. She also tours with “The Wisdom of WIT,” her solo version of the play. Megan gives workshops to healthcare and end-of-life care venues across the country and gives public talks on the human face of medicine.

“Healthcare for the Homeless” – Dr. David Buck (Nov. 3, Cullen Auditorium)

Dr. David Buck began working with the underserved, developing medical and dental clinics for the indigent population in Houston in 1984 after working with Mother Teresa in Calcutta, India. In 1999, he founded Healthcare for the Homeless – Houston (HHH), where he now serves as president. He serves on multiple local and national boards working to progress underserved and homeless medical care. Through his position as a professor in the Department of Family and Community Medicine at Baylor, he supervises the Houston Outreach Medicine Education and Social Services (HOMES) track that allows third-year medical students to earn credit by working at the HOMES Clinic, a student-run clinic he founded with a former medical student and now operated by HHH.

“9 Millimeter” – Dr. Richard Lyn-Cook (Nov. 10, Cullen Auditorium)

Dr. Richard Lyn-Cook, assistant professor of family and community medicine at Baylor College of Medicine, is board certified in both internal medicine and pediatrics and is the current medical director of the School Based Clinics and Troubleshooters Mobile Program of the Harris Health System. Lyn-Cook completed his undergraduate and medical studies at Yale University. Between undergraduate and medical schools, he worked at the Children’s Defense Fund in Washington, D.C. He completed a residency in combined internal medicine and pediatrics at the Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City and stayed on for a research fellowship where he received his Master’s degree in public health. His presentation is about his experience as a patient and long recovery after a gunshot injury.

“Urea Cycle Disorders: Beyond the Pathway” – John and Renee Zalusky and Cynthia Le Mons (Nov. 17, Cullen Auditorium)

Renee and John Zalusky's daughter, Zoey, died unexpectedly of complications of undiagnosed hyperammonemia, or excess ammonia in the blood. Her diagnosis of ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency, which caused the excess, was not discovered until after the recipient of her liver died several days after the transplant surgery. Overcome by their daughter's death, yet empowered to prevent similar tragedies, the Zaluskys are working with Cynthia Le Mons, executive director of the National Urea Cycle Disorder Foundation, and others to raise awareness about the signs, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment of OTC deficiency and other urea cycle disorders.

For more information about Compassion and the Art of Medicine, contact Dr. Kenya Steele at kenyas@bcm.edu or Bridget Angel at bat@bcm.edu or (713) 798-6590.

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